Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Will It Monitor?

We often get asked “Will Nagios monitor XYZ?” so we built a device to answer just that question. Will it monitor? Let’s find out!

Announcing the Nagios Knowledge Base

The Nagios Support Team has been working hard to compile our new Nagios Support Knowledge Base!

Almost everyone who has used a Nagios product is familiar with our documentation.  We pride ourselves in writing solid docs, which is why we are proud to announce our centralized Nagios Support Knowledge Base!

The new Knowledge Base (KB) will improve users’ ability to find and use Nagios documentation for their environment.  First and foremost, the KB provides a database of documentation that can be searched by topic, text, and tag so multiple related docs can be discovered at the same time.  The goal was to group the search results together to broaden the knowledge presented beyond just the strictly relevant doc and make it easy to find exactly what users needed. By creating the Nagios KB, we now have a central repository for our docs that is laid out in a logical hierarchy of topics and subtopics. This should help group concepts together, improve cohesion between docs, and allow our users to find what they are looking for.

One thing to note: Our old docs are still going to be around, but we will be slowly migrating their content into the KB so over time we will reference the PDF links less and less in favor of the KB articles.

I don’t want to ramble on and on about the new KB, so go check it out for yourself!

Happy Monitoring!

How To Set Up A Nagios XI License Maintenance Status Check

There are a few ways to set up a Nagios XI license maintenance status check. It is also very easy to check the Nagios XI license maintenance status inside Nagios XI. Here’s how…

Once logged in to Nagios XI you can navigate to the Admin menu then click on the License Information link on the left (However, many administrators simply forget to do so!). From the License Information screen you can view the time remaining on your license and/or click the renew now link to begin the renewal process. That’s all there is to it; nice and easy!

Setting Up a license Status Check in Nagios XI

Some Nagios XI users showed interest in setting up a license status check in XI. Having such a check makes perfect sense.  If you were notified that your license is about to expire, you would renew it on time thus avoiding any possible service interruptions. Also, you may be running several Nagios XI instances. You wouldn’t want to log in to each one just to check when each license expires. You could monitor all of the licenses from one central Nagios XI server.

I wrote a small bash script, which can be used to set up a license status check in XI. You can download the plugin from here:

http://assets.nagios.com/downloads/nagiosxi/scripts/check_license.sh

Install it as you would normally install any other plugin in Nagios XI.

Admin -> Manage Plugins -> Browse -> check_license.sh -> Upload Plugin

You can test the plugin from the command line by running:

To view the usage (help) menu, run the plugin with passing a “-h” or “–help” flag.

nagios license status check

After you verify that the plugin works from the command line (see the example in the help menu), you can proceed with setting up a command and a service check under the Core Config Manager in Nagios XI.

check nagios license status

 

nagios check license

Save and Apply Configuration.

From the Nagios XI web interface go to the “Service Detail” menu and click on the newly added service. Schedule a forced immediate check to make sure the check returns the expected output.

service detail screen of license check status in nagios xi

For more information, please review our documentation (“Nagios XI – How To Set Up A Nagios XI License Maintenance Status Check“):

https://assets.nagios.com/downloads/nagiosxi/docs/How-To-Set-Up-A-Nagios-XI-License-Maintenance-Status-Check.pdf

Happy Monitoring!

Enabling SNMP on Cisco Router – Cisco Devices

SNMP – Enabling SNMP on Cisco Router

—-

We’ve had a lot of questions on the process for configuring SNMP on Cisco devices, mainly routers and switches, in this article we will give you the steps on how to configure SNMP on Cisco routers (and Catalyst switches).

Note: We’ve tested these commands in our lab but if you have any additional questions on what may be required for your environment, please reach out to your network administrator and/or Cisco to verify that they will work with your specific devices.

1. SSH or Telnet into your router/switch:

* We recommend enabling SSH and disabling telnet wherever possible because telnet will send all the information you enter (including usernames and passwords) as plaintext across your network because it is a insecure protocol.

If you’re connecting from Linux
——————————-
ssh user@X.X.X.X

OR

telnet X.X.X.X

If you’re connecting from Windows
———————————
You can connect with Putty or another SSH/Telnet client. Just type in the router/switch IP address and select the SSH or Telnet protocol when connecting.

2. Enter enable mode:
enable

3. Enter into configuration mode:
configure terminal

4. Setup a read-only SNMP community on the device so that you can monitor it with Nagios:
snmp-server community YOURCOMMUNITY ro

* We recommend that you come up with a complex SNMP community string (capitals, lowercase, alpha-numeric characters) but don’t use any special characters because not all software will work with them in it.

5. Exit configuration mode and save the changes you’ve made:
exit
write memory

Here are the configuration commands (simplified):

MYROUTER>enable
Password:
MYROUTER#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
MYROUTER(config)#snmp-server community YOURCOMMUNITY ro
MYROUTER(config)#exit
*Mar  1 00:14:40.987: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
MYROUTER#write memory
Building configuration…
[OK]
MYROUTER#exit

Configuring SNMP Traps

———-

SNMP traps are a great way of getting alerted from a device in near real-time. When you setup SNMP traps on your compatible device and it detects an error (or another piece of information you’ve set as a trap), the device will send a trap immediately through SNMP to your Nagios server so that you can act on it according to your Nagios configurations.

Here is the process for settings up SNMP traps on your Cisco devices:

1. SSH or telnet into your router/switch.
ssh user@X.X.X.X

* We recommend enabling SSH and disabling telnet wherever possible because telnet will send all the information you enter (including usernames and passwords) as plaintext across your network.

OR

telnet X.X.X.X

2. Enter enable mode:
enable

3. Enter into configuration mode:
configure terminal

4. Setup your Nagios server as the trap target:
snmp-server host NAGIOSIPADDRESS version 2c YOURCOMMUNITY

5. Setting up the type of SNMP traps that you want to send:
You can enable all SNMP traps with this command:

snmp-server enable traps

or you can enable individual traps with the command template:

snmp-server enable traps [notification-type [notification-options]]

As an example, to setup SNMP traps for OSPF errors you would run this command:

snmp-server enable traps ospf errors

6. Exit configuration mode and save the changes you’ve made:
exit
write memory

Here are the configuration commands (simplified):

MYROUTER>enable
Password:
MYROUTER#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
MYROUTER(config)#snmp-server host IPADDRESS version 2c YOURCOMMUNITY
MYROUTER(config)#snmp-server enable traps
MYROUTER(config)#exit
*Mar  1 00:14:40.987: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
MYROUTER#write memory
Building configuration…
[OK]
MYROUTER#exit

You can read more about setting up SNMP traps with Nagios XI here.

https://assets.nagios.com/downloads/nagiosxi/docs/Integrating_SNMP_Traps_With_Nagios_XI.pdf