Tag Archive for 'script'

How To Set Up A Nagios XI License Maintenance Status Check

There are a few ways to set up a Nagios XI license maintenance status check. It is also very easy to check the Nagios XI license maintenance status inside Nagios XI. Here’s how…

Once logged in to Nagios XI you can navigate to the Admin menu then click on the License Information link on the left (However, many administrators simply forget to do so!). From the License Information screen you can view the time remaining on your license and/or click the renew now link to begin the renewal process. That’s all there is to it; nice and easy!

Setting Up a license Status Check in Nagios XI

Some Nagios XI users showed interest in setting up a license status check in XI. Having such a check makes perfect sense.  If you were notified that your license is about to expire, you would renew it on time thus avoiding any possible service interruptions. Also, you may be running several Nagios XI instances. You wouldn’t want to log in to each one just to check when each license expires. You could monitor all of the licenses from one central Nagios XI server.

I wrote a small bash script, which can be used to set up a license status check in XI. You can download the plugin from here:


Install it as you would normally install any other plugin in Nagios XI.

Admin -> Manage Plugins -> Browse -> check_license.sh -> Upload Plugin

You can test the plugin from the command line by running:

To view the usage (help) menu, run the plugin with passing a “-h” or “–help” flag.

nagios license status check

After you verify that the plugin works from the command line (see the example in the help menu), you can proceed with setting up a command and a service check under the Core Config Manager in Nagios XI.

check nagios license status


nagios check license

Save and Apply Configuration.

From the Nagios XI web interface go to the “Service Detail” menu and click on the newly added service. Schedule a forced immediate check to make sure the check returns the expected output.

service detail screen of license check status in nagios xi

For more information, please review our documentation (“Nagios XI – How To Set Up A Nagios XI License Maintenance Status Check“):


Happy Monitoring!

Unleashing the Power of Nagios — Utilizing the Actions Component

The “Action URL” component has been quietly deprecated in favor of the newer “Actions” component. The “Actions” component has been released for some time now and has been rolled up into the base install of XI. Although it is most commonly used to add URLs to specific Nagios objects on the details pages in XI, it is by far more advanced than its predecessor “Action URL”. The “Actions” component is truly one of the more powerful components available for Nagios XI, on par with event handlers in extensibility and complexity.

The use cases for the Actions component are near endless. A simple example would consist of the streamlining of repeated tasks, like the adding of common comments to particular hosts. This can be accomplished using the Actions component and the command pipe. For the following example, we will assume that the comment to be added to a host relates to the completion of a successful security audit by the user “auditor”. This action will include the passing of the %host% macro to a script that will write to the Nagios command pipe.

First create a script named “security_audit_completed.sh” in /usr/local/nagios/libexec. The script follows:

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Integrating autoIT With Nagios

AutoIT is a very powerful set of software tools whichs allows the recording and writing of scripts to automate windows tasks, from moving the mouse cursor to sending key strokes. In this example autoIT is used in conjunction with an NRPE check to open firefox.exe and record the time it takes to load a URL, then sends this time to the Nagios  XI server where the plugin pulls it in as a service. This may also be used to grab the loading time of a specific program or service and the script shows where this can be changed.

Having the ability to run these scripts via NRPE checks allows system administrators to custom tailor Windows server automation without having to initiate them locally.

Some of the abilities of AutoIT are as follows:

  • Easy to learn BASIC-like syntax
  • Simulate keystrokes and mouse movements
  • Manipulate windows and processes
  • Interact with all standard windows controls
  • Scripts can be compiled into standalone executables
  • Create Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs)
  • COM support
  • Regular expressions
  • Directly call external DLL and Windows API functions
  • Scriptable RunAs functions
  • Detailed helpfile and large community-based support forums
  • Compatible with Windows 2000 / XP / 2003 / Vista / 2008 / Windows 7 / 2008 R2
  • Unicode and x64 support
  • Digitally signed for peace of mind
  • Works with Windows Vista’s User Account Control (UAC)

The above bullet points were taken from http://www.autoitscript.com/site/autoit/


Below is a video showing an example of the check website load time script in action:

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